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Economics: Dictionaries

Reference Resources

What is "Reference"?

"Reference" is a term to describe publications such as dictionaries, encyclopaedias, handbooks, multi-author edited volumes, guides, compendia, collections of essays, companions, manuals, etc.
 
Reference works give you short treatments of factual information, illustrations, definitions, condensed overviews, and in some cases also give lengthy essays. They introduce you to topics, and can help you decide whether a subject interests you, or if it is manageable and workable.
 
Browse the other boxes on this page for:
  • Print Reference Books, and
  • Electronic Reference Books
Image courtesy: WikimediaCommons

Print Reference Books

Reference Print Books

The library has economics encyclopaedias in print format.
Call numbers are included, so you can locate them in the Reference Collection on the Main Level of the library.
 
Almanac of Business & Industrial Financial Ratios Ref HF5681.R25 A45 1987-
Business Cycles & Depressions: An Encyclopedia Ref HB 3711.B936 1997
Canadian Development Report (North-South Institute) Ref HC59.8 .C364 1996-
Dictionary of Economics (Oxford) Ref HB 61.B554 2003
Economics & Law (New Palgrave) (3 v) Ref K 487.E3 N48 1998
Encyclopedia of Political Economy (2v) Ref HB61 .E554 2001
Encyclopedia of Population (2 v) Ref HB 871.E538 2003
Fortune Encyclopedia of Economics Ref HB61 .F67 1993
Government Finance Statistics Yearbook (IMF) Ref HJ101 .G68 2000-
Handbook of North American Industry (NAFTA) Ref HF 1746.H36
Japanese Economics (MIT Encyclopedia) Ref HC 462.9.H73 1994
The McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Economics Ref HB61 .E55 1994
Value of a Dollar 1860-1989 Ref HB 235.U6 V35 1994
Worldmark Encyclopedia of the Nations (5v) Ref G63 .W67 1998 
 
John Maynard Keynes   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Economics is a very dangerous science
John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946)
Image: Wikimedia Commons