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UNIV 110 Scholarly Inquiry and Research Methods: Assignment #3

Introduction to the skills and tools of information research in a high tech environment, beginning with topic analysis and ending with a sound, analytical research report. Emphasis is placed on development of critical thinking strategies.

Assignment Three

This Assignment is due at the beginning of next class.  Send by e-mail attachment to badke@twu.ca

  

Use the above assignment template to complete the assignment.  It's a rich text format file that should work in any word processing program. Clicking on the link will download it to your computer.  Find it at the bottom of your screen (Chrome) or open it when prompted (other browsers).  If you have any problems, please e-mail me and I'll send you a copy.  You can enter your assignment answers right on this document and then send it to me by e-mail attachment.

Consult the rubrics to the right to determine what you should be doing to achieve excellence in the assignment.

 Assignment Instructions:

Reading: Research Strategies, Chapter Four, Chapter Five, and Chapter Six: Section 6.1 - 6.2

PART ONE

1. State your research question.

2. Go to the main search box on the library home page to begin your searching.

3. Start with a Books search, choosing the "Titles" option, to identify books relevant to your research question. It is very
important at this stage that you are using the Books tab rather than Search Everything:

 


 

4. Indicate the search words you used. Do not use any limiters (left column) for this search. If you don't get many results, set the dropdown next to the OneSearch box to "Keyword" instead of "Title." This will give you more results.

5. List eight books that speak to your research question (use APA, MLA, or Turabian format that includes author, title, place, publisher and date). Put them in alphabetical order by author.  Do not number your list. [Note that books are sometimes broader than the narrower issue you are pursuing, so your books may contain your issue rather than being just about your issue.]

 

PART TWO

1. Repeat the keyword search you did in Part One.

2. Go down the column to the left of your results to Limit by Subject, and choose one or more limiters:
 

 

This presentation - http://prezi.com/kx_jtucv-xsm/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy - shows two ways of doing subject searches.  You may want to try both of them if you have time: ‚Äč

3. Indicate the subject heading(s) you used.

4. List eight books that speak to your research question (use APA, MLA, or Turabian format that includes author, title, place, publisher and date). Put them in alphabetical order by author.  Do not number your list. You may have some results that are the same as those found in Part One.  That is OK. [Note that books are sometimes broader than the narrower issue you are pursuing, so your books may contain your issue rather than being just about your issue.]

5. Indicate whether or not limiting by subject heading helped improve the relevance of your results.  Why or why not?

Note that, if you only had a few titles in your original search from Part One, the subject heading search may not work for you. If this is the case, explain the problem and let me know what you would have done if subject headings had been available.  Try starting with a broader search (e.g. instead of climate change arctic polar bears, search on climate change arctic) and use the subject heading search that should now be available.

Getting citations formatted properly can be a challenge.  If you are using the Cite feature in OneSearch, drop the information about the database the book came from. 

This graphic will explain how to format citations in OneSearch and many other of our EBSCO databases:


This is what the citation should look like for each of three common formats:

APA: 

Spears, L. C., & Lawrence, M. (2004). Practicing servant-leadership: Succeeding through trust, bravery, and
forgiveness. Jossey-Bass. [Note that the date is after the author, most title words do not
start with capital letters, and title is in italics].
 

MLA:

Spears, Larry C. and Michele Lawrence. Practicing Servant-Leadership: Succeeding through Trust, Bravery, and  Forgiveness. Jossey-Bass, 2004. [Note that title is in italics, most title words are capitalized and date is at the end, and APA no longer includes place of publication before the publisher name].

Chicago/Turabian

Spears, Larry C., and Michele Lawrence. Practicing Servant-Leadership: Succeeding through Trust, Bravery, and Forgiveness. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2004. [Note that title is in italics, most title words are capitalized and date is at the end].

 

Your Professor

Rubric

A well done assignment will include the following features:

1. Search terms that closely match the intention of your research question (keywords preferably drawn from your research questions and subject headings that at least cover the subject matter of your question).

2. Book citations that show promise of answering your research question (note that a book may cover your question in only a portion of its contents and still be useful).

3. Consistent bibliographic format.